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Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

It might seem impossible to create your very own gluten free sourdough starter from scratch, but it actually is really easy and we believe it is the only way to make gluten free bread that tastes authentic and that will truly satisfy you like regular wheat bread. The sourdough process is magical, and it gives gluten free bread strength, great flavor, and nice texture. We find it easier to maintain and bake with a gluten free starter than it is with a wheat starter, so don’t feel intimidated by this process just because you are gluten free. You can do this, and we bet you’ll find tremendous satisfaction and joy in baking your very own gluten free sourdough bread.

Jovial_GF_Bread_Flour

When you work with a sourdough starter and jovial’s Gluten Free Bread Flour, you are combining the best of both worlds – a healthier leavening process powered by wild yeasts together with a gluten free flour formula that is made with ancient grain flours and no added starches. Our flours provide added fiber and protein, and this is what gluten free bread is normally lacking, and when combined with the added strength sourdough will lend, you can bake breads with just flour, water, starter, and salt.

Here is a brief introduction to the process, with the detailed recipe and instructions below.

  • Gluten free starter is made from a mix of jovial bread flour and water.
  • You start out by mixing a ratio of flour and water and letting the mixture sit out at room temperature until it starts to bubble. 
  • Each day you will take a small amount of the starter from the day before and add fresh flour and water. This process is called refreshing. You discard the remaining starter from the day before, only keeping the new mixture. It may seem wasteful, but you will discard less than you would if you kept adding to the same starter each day, because the ratio of flour to water to starter would just get bigger and bigger. 
  • You won’t use your starter to bake bread until it is ready, meaning it bubbles up within 6 to 8 hours of refreshing and goes from a sharp smell to a yogurty aroma. At this point, wild yeasts have multiplied enough to rise your bread and the pH is correct.
  • Once your starter bubbles up within 6 to 8 hours, you can store it in the refrigerator in a sealed container. When you want to bake bread, you take what you need from the refrigerator until it runs low, then you refresh it to replenish your supply. We recommend refreshing your starter once a week for the first few months to keep it strong.
  • It does take a few months for your starter to reach its full maturity and potential, so just keep in mind your bread will just keep improving the more you bake.
  • It took us months to develop this and a  full collection of sourdough bread recipes, tweaking the amounts of gluten free flour and liquids each day of testing. We know you will have success if you use a digital baking scale to measure each ingredient in grams, like we do. Measuring in cups is not accurate and will lead to inconsistent results. Trust us when we say it is worth the investment in a scale if you do not already have one. We want your bread to come out just as good as ours!

Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

Day One

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a small glass container that can be tightly sealed with a lid or plastic wrap, mix the flour and water until most of the flour is absorbed. A few small lumps may remain in the mixture.
  2. Tightly cover and let rest at room temperature for 24 hours.

Day Two


Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a small, clean glass container that can be tightly sealed with a lid or plastic wrap, mix water into the starter until dissolved, then mix in the flour until it is absorbed. A few small lumps may remain in the mixture.
  2. Tightly cover and let rest at room temperature for 24 hours.

Day Three

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a small, clean glass container that can be tightly sealed with a lid or plastic wrap, Mix water into the starter until dissolved, then mix in the flour until it is almost absorbed. A few small lumps may remain in the mixture.
  2. Tightly cover and let rest at room temperature for 24 hours.

Day Four

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a small, clean glass container that can be tightly sealed with a lid or plastic wrap, Mix water into the starter until dissolved, then mix in the flour until it is almost absorbed. A few small lumps may remain in the mixture.
  2. Tightly cover and let rest at room temperature for 24 hours.

Day Five and After

Today is the first day you will refresh your starter, which you will repeat once a day until it rises up and forms bubbles within 6 to 8 hours. That may happen after a week, or it may take a few days longer. This is where the patience comes in, as the process does vary from kitchen to kitchen. People always ask, “How will I know when my starter is ready?” Until you see your starter bubbling in this time frame, your starter is not ready for baking bread. Storing the starter in a clear glass container can help you observe the progress better.

Until your starter is strong, you will only use a small piece to refresh from Day Five onward (just 2 teaspoons or 10 g) and discard the rest. For us, it took about 10 days to get good bread from our starter. We began baking bread after a week, but the bread baked dense, as you can see from the picture below. Then, magically, a few days later and continue refreshing, our loaf rose beautifully. At the point, we were able to refrigerate our starter, but we used it every weekday to bake bread. The more you bake, the more your starter will develop, and the better and better your bread will turn out. Once your bread is rising, you only refresh your starter when it runs low, so there is no more waste.

REFRESHING YOUR STARTER

Ingredients

 

Instructions

  1. Place the starter in a small, clean glass container that can be tightly sealed with a lid or plastic wrap. Add warm water and mix until the starter is dissolved. Add flour and mix with a fork until most of the flour is absorbed. A few small lumps may remain. Tightly cover and let rest at room temperature for 6 to 12 hours hours until the starter has bubbled up considerably. At first, this may take longer. Do not leave your starter at room temperature for more than 24 hours.
  2. Watch the starter closely each day. As it becomes more active, the amount and size of the bubbles in the starter will increase significantly and will change the appearance of the starter. When the starter rises up and doubles in size after 6 to 8 hours, you are ready to bake bread!
  3. Once your starter is ready and your bread is rising nicely, you can refrigerate the starter. When you want to bake bread, remove the quantity needed and use it cold from the refrigerator to mix up the bread recipe. Leave the remaining starter in the refrigerator, and when it becomes low, use the recipe from Day 5 to refresh and replenish the starter, always letting the starter rise after refreshing for 6 to 8 hours. For the first two months, you should refresh your starter once a week to keep it strong, then you can store it longer without refreshing.

If you need a larger batch of starter for more baking, you can double the recipe for refreshing and follow the same instructions.

Please contact us with any questions or concerns you might have during this process. We wish nothing more than for your starter to work perfectly and for you to enjoy healthier and more delicious gluten free bread. Good luck!

When your starter is ready, give one of these sourdough bread recipes a try. More coming soon!

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