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Crusty Gluten Free Artisan Bread

Crusty Gluten Free Artisan Bread

If you’ve been missing a hearty, European-style artisan bread since going gluten free, we think you’ll love our new recipe for Crusty Gluten Free Artisan Bread! Made with simple ingredients and no eggs, dairy or seeds, this bread satisfies like wheat bread, because it’s made with ancient grain flours and no added starches.

The finished loaf actually comes together quickly, so you’ll have fresh, homemade bread ready in under two hours from start to finish. In order to achieve the crusty texture, you will absolutely need to bake the bread in a 5-quart Dutch Oven or larger. Preheating the pot gets it super hot so when your loaf gets placed inside, it gets a nice rise. By baking with the lid on, the moisture leaving the dough creates steam which gives the bread a hearty, crispy crust. Without the Dutch Oven, the bread will not turn out the same.


Crusty Gluten Free Artisan Bread

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Place a Dutch oven, with the lid on, in the oven. Preheat the oven to 500°F. The pot will have to preheat for 1 hour.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the water and yeast until dissolved and creamy. Let stand for 15 minutes until the mixture bubbles.
  3. Add the flour and salt and whisk until all of the flour is absorbed. Add oil and whisk until the oil is incorporated. The dough will be very soft. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rise for 45 minutes.
  4. With a stiff spatula, mix the dough vigorously to deflate the rise. In a small bowl, beat the vinegar and baking soda together until the baking soda dissolves. Stir the baking soda mixture into the dough and mix until well-incorporated throughout the dough.
  5. To shape the loaf, use a large serving spoon to scoop the dough on to the middle of a 15-inch long piece of parchment paper. Mound the dough to create a tall round, mixing with the spoon gently as you go to release any air pockets.
  6. With a small offset spatula, gently smooth out the surface of the loaf. Lightly dust the top of the loaf with flour.
  7. Remove the pot from the oven and take off the lid. Be careful, the pot will be very hot. Lift the loaf up by the edges of the parchment paper and lower it into the pot.  Cover and place in the oven.
  8. Bake the bread for 45 minutes with the lid on the pot.
  9. Remove from the oven and lift out the bread with a metal spatula. Transfer the bread to a wire rack and cool the bread completely before slicing, about 3 hours. The bread will be even better if you let it sit out overnight and slice it the next day. 
  10. The bread will stay fresh in a sealed plastic bag for up to 3 days or you can slice it and freeze for up to a month. Remove the slices from the freezer as you need them and defrost them at room temperature before toasting.

7 Responses to Crusty Gluten Free Artisan Bread

  1. Helen says:

    Can one BUY a bread like this? With no eggs, dairy, etc.? If so, where? Isn’t yeast bad to eat for the gut? Iam not a big bread eater, but this looks,good so I ask. Thank you.

    • jovial says:

      We do not sell the bread, just the flour, but the recipe is really easy to make. We will be getting into gluten free sourdough in the fall.

    • Becky says:

      Dietary yeast is not typically bad for consumption, it’s dead when you eat it. That being said, someone may have an allergy or sensitivity so it would be bad for that person. There are other yeasts that are health concerns, such as candida, but that’s not a dietary yeast.

      If you don’t let the yeast ferment your dough (as in sourdough), then you’ll have to enrich the dough with eggs, dairy, etc. If you’re using gluten-free flours, those enrichments are helpful to make up for the lack of gluten. You can always experiment and make your own bread without various enrichments, but I don’t think you’ll ever find a gluten-free bread on the market without them. Maybe you can find a baker who makes gluten-free sourdough with few or no enrichments?

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